Monthly Archives: August 2013

Translator Profile – Jorim De Clercq

By | Business Blog, Language, Latest News, Translation, Translator Talk, Translators | One Comment

Translator of the Day

Today in our Translator Profile series we’ll be talking to Jorim De Clercq – as you know we’ll be asking the same questions that we asked Gabriele yesterday, but getting his very different responses. Like me, Jorim worked in another, non-translation related industry and toiled away as a translator on the side. Many translators work like this at the beginning and it can be a brilliant way of gaining expertise that proves extremely helpful when it comes to deciding on a translation specialism later on in your career.

Q1: How did you get into translation?

I remember when I was little, I used to spend my time engrossed in the dictionary learning new words. From that moment I knew that I wanted to do something with languages.

Unfortunately, I ended up studying mechanics rather than languages. But later, while I was working as an industrial designer and studying English and Spanish on the side, my boss would ask me to translate industrial texts into Spanish and English. When I moved to Ecuador and married my lovely wife, I was even busier with languages. In the beginning, I taught English, but I soon discovered that I liked translating more. So I decided I wanted to be a translator.

Q2: What languages do you work in?

I translate from Spanish and English into Dutch and Flemish.

Q3: What has been your favourite project ever?

As I like cooking, my favourite project was translating dessert recipes. When I finished the project, I wanted to try out the recipes myself.

Q4: Why do you like translation?

I like to be busy with languages and I like investigating terms and words I don´t know.

Q5: If you could translate anything in the world (past or present), what would it be?

Oh yes, an easy one… I have one particular favourite cookery website. It contains a huge collection of recipes, and as I always use this website when I cook, it would be great to translate all the recipes available on it.

Q6: Do you think translation is an art or a science?

It depends. Sometimes it´s an art, especially when a text requires that you improvise.

Sometimes it´s more science, especially when you have to do a lot of research.

Q7: Do you work with Computer Assisted Translation (CAT) tools? If yes, why? If no, why?

Yes, because they are very helpful. I like the quality control capabilities of these tools.

Q8: What makes a good project manager?

First, a good project manager has to love his work. He has to understand the translators’ needs. Secondly, he also has to be a good communicator. Before assigning a translation task, he has to give clear instructions. Translators enjoy working with this kind of project manager.

Q9: Where do you live?

I live in the capital of Ecuador, Quito.

Q10: What do you do when you’re not translating?

In my free time, I like to watch a good movie with my wife. We like to go shopping and we love to travel.

Jorim’s contact details:

Email: jorim81@gmail.com

ProZ profilehttp://www.proz.com/profile/1543469

 

Translator Profile – Gabriele Postberg

By | Business, Business Blog, Language, Latest News, Translation, Translator Talk, Translators | No Comments

Translator of the Day

First up in our series of Translator Profiles is Gabriele Postberg. As I explained in the last blog post, the series will take the form of a short quiz, (just 10 questions) allowing each of our freelance translators the chance to give us their thoughts about translation, the industry in general and some personal info. In the interests of fairness and scientific accuracy(!) the questions are the same for all of the freelancers, but some of the answers have been pretty different! Here’s what Gabriele had to say:

Q1: How did you get into translation?
Well, that’s quite a long story. After school I tried the hotel industry first, but quickly realized that it wasn’t for me. Then I trained as a foreign languages correspondent with a telecommunications company in Frankfurt. It was there that I realized translating isn’t boring at all. So once I’d completed the training, I went on to get a degree in Translation Studies at the Faculty of Translation Studies, Linguistics and Cultural Studies in Germersheim, Germany.
A year with a large German translation agency and three years’ employment with the German stock exchange followed, before I became a freelancer in August 2011.

Q2: What languages do you work in?
English > German
German > English
French > German

Q3: What has been your favourite project ever?
I actually enjoy translating certificates (birth, marriage, death, school, anything). Translation-wise they’re not that exciting, but I enjoy the challenge of making them look as much like the original as possible. Nerdy, I know. But since I’m a sworn translator I get a lot of them, and it would be really tough if they weren’t a little fun too.
Apart from certificates I like texts that are interesting and from which I learn something new, like anything to do with other cultures, traveling or art.

Q4: Why do you like translation?
Because every project is a new challenge. No one would ask me to translate the same document twice. I love that I get to learn something new with every text, and that it never gets boring.

Q5: If you could translate anything in the world (past or present), what would it be?
I think children’s books would be nice to translate. Or travel guides.

Q6: Do you think translation is an art or a science?
Definitely both.

Q7: Do you work with Computer Assisted Translation (CAT) tools? If yes, why? If no, why?
Yes, I work with Trados 2011. My memory is okay, but not great. So I found I kept looking up the same terminology over and over again. Trados helps me with consistency.

Q8: What makes a good project manager?
Being organized, patient, friendly, knowing the translation business.

Q9: Where do you live?
In Weinheim, a small town just 15 km from Heidelberg, Germany.

Q10: What do you do when you’re not translating?
I would love to read more. But I have a 18 month old daughter, so when I’m not translating, I spend a lot of time at the playground. And I love to travel!

Gabriele’s contact details:

Email: info@postberg-translations.com


Websitehttp://www.postberg-translations.com/

ProZ profilehttp://www.proz.com/profile/1516640

 

Our next Translator Profile in the series will be Jorim De Clercq and will be posted tomorrow. Hope you enjoyed our first very nosy interview!

English spelling 101

By | English, Grammar, Language, Translator Talk | No Comments

“But everybody speaks English now!” If I’ve heard this once, I’ve heard it a thousand times, whether on holiday or away on business, the presumption that the whole world speaks English is pretty common. If, horror of horrors, the person with whom the holidaymaker is speaking doesn’t immediately understand, many resort to the “I’ll just talk louder” plan, as though English must be spoken at a certain volume to be understood.

English Spanish phrasebook

Apart from the fact that this attitude is at best naïve, and at worst horrendously arrogant, I don’t think many people consider just how difficult English is as a language. It’s full of irregular verbs, tricky conjugations and pronunciation quirks, and, just as you think you’ve mastered it, another word comes along which bucks the trend again. Of course, all languages have their difficulties. This week on the Silver Tongue Facebook page, I posted a link to a Language Difficulty Ranking system, which rates languages on their perceived difficulty, along with the approximate time they take to learn. This was based on how similar to English the languages were, as judged by the Foreign Service Institute in the US. Obviously many things contribute to the ease with which an individual learns a language, and the similarity to their native language is just one small part of this. For fun, I’ve copied out a poem written by Bennett Cerf, a publisher and one of the founders of Random House – he also had the reputation of being one of the most prolific punsters of his generation, which is probably why I like him so much. There’s an audio file for this too, so you can listen as you read it – essential for fully appreciating the (wonderful) strangeness of the English language and its spelling quirks!

The wind was rough
And cold and blough
She kept her hands inside her mough.

It chilled her through,
Her nose turned blough,
And still the squall the faster flough.

And yet although,
There was no snough,
The weather was a cruel fough.

It made her cough,
(Please do not scough);
She coughed until her hat blew ough.

Bennett Cerf (May 1898 – August 1971)

Audio: Bennett Cerf poem

 

Whatever your requirements, I can work something out to suit your style. GET IN TOUCH

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